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authorRalph Amissah <ralph@amissah.com>2015-09-30 04:00:01 +0000
committerRalph Amissah <ralph@amissah.com>2015-09-30 04:18:20 +0000
commit9dad7ad10f8716c30729c477e1c13dfc405139e7 (patch)
treeb378c927f0792d891d33176192e21b6262853ecf
parentmake a blurb non-substantive, no ocn (diff)
downloadsisu-markup-samples-9dad7ad10f8716c30729c477e1c13dfc405139e7.zip
sisu-markup-samples-9dad7ad10f8716c30729c477e1c13dfc405139e7.tar.xz
typo...
-rw-r--r--CHANGELOG3
-rw-r--r--data/samples/current/en/two_bits.christopher_kelty.sst2
2 files changed, 4 insertions, 1 deletions
diff --git a/CHANGELOG b/CHANGELOG
index e61191a..4dd3c30 100644
--- a/CHANGELOG
+++ b/CHANGELOG
@@ -21,6 +21,9 @@ Reverse Chronological:
* make a blurb non-substantive, no ocn
Wealth of Networks
+ * typo...
+ Two Bits
+
* sisu-markup-samples_7.1.1.orig.tar.xz (2015-05-21:20/4) [version follows sisu]
http://git.sisudoc.org/gitweb/?p=doc/sisu-markup-samples.git;a=log;h=refs/tags/sisu-markup-samples_7.1.1
diff --git a/data/samples/current/en/two_bits.christopher_kelty.sst b/data/samples/current/en/two_bits.christopher_kelty.sst
index 659a974..07234bf 100644
--- a/data/samples/current/en/two_bits.christopher_kelty.sst
+++ b/data/samples/current/en/two_bits.christopher_kelty.sst
@@ -895,7 +895,7 @@ The attitudes that geeks take in responding to these questions fall along a spec
2~ Protestant Reformation
-Geeks love allegories about the Protestant Reformation; they relish stories of Luther and Calvin, of popery and iconoclasm, of reformation ,{[pg 67]}, over revolution. Allegories of Protestant revolt allow geeks to make sense of the relationship between the state (the monarchy), large corporations (the Catholic Church), the small start-ups, individual programmers, and adepts among whom they spend most of their time (Protestant reformers), and the laity (known as "lusers" and "sheeple"). It gives them a way to assert that they prefer reformation (to save capitalism from the capitalists) over revolution. Obviously, not all geeks tell stories of "religious wars" and the Protestant Reformation, but these images reappear often enough in conversations that most geeks will more or less instantly recognize them as a way of making sense of modern corporate, state, and political power in the arena of information technology: the figures of Pope, the Catholic Church, the Vatican, the monarchs of various nations, the laity, the rebel adepts like Luther and Calvin, as well as models of sectarianism, iconoclasm ("In the beginning was the Command Line"), politicoreligious power, and arcane theological argumentation.~{ Stephenson, In the Beginning Was the Command Line. }~ The allegories that unfold provide geeks a way to make sense of a similarly complex modern situation in which it is not the Church and the State that struggle, but the Corporation and the State; and what geeks struggle over are not matters of church doctrine and organization, but matters of information technology and its organization as intellectual property and economic motor. I stress here that this is not an analogy that I myself am making (though I happily make use of it), but is one that is in wide circulation among the geeks I study. To the historian or religious critic, it may seem incomplete, or absurd, or bizarre, but it still serves a specific function, and this is why I highlight it as one component of the practical and technical ideas of order that geeks share.
+Geeks love allegories about the Protestant Reformation; they relish stories of Luther and Calvin, of property and iconoclasm, of reformation ,{[pg 67]}, over revolution. Allegories of Protestant revolt allow geeks to make sense of the relationship between the state (the monarchy), large corporations (the Catholic Church), the small start-ups, individual programmers, and adepts among whom they spend most of their time (Protestant reformers), and the laity (known as "lusers" and "sheeple"). It gives them a way to assert that they prefer reformation (to save capitalism from the capitalists) over revolution. Obviously, not all geeks tell stories of "religious wars" and the Protestant Reformation, but these images reappear often enough in conversations that most geeks will more or less instantly recognize them as a way of making sense of modern corporate, state, and political power in the arena of information technology: the figures of Pope, the Catholic Church, the Vatican, the monarchs of various nations, the laity, the rebel adepts like Luther and Calvin, as well as models of sectarianism, iconoclasm ("In the beginning was the Command Line"), politicoreligious power, and arcane theological argumentation.~{ Stephenson, In the Beginning Was the Command Line. }~ The allegories that unfold provide geeks a way to make sense of a similarly complex modern situation in which it is not the Church and the State that struggle, but the Corporation and the State; and what geeks struggle over are not matters of church doctrine and organization, but matters of information technology and its organization as intellectual property and economic motor. I stress here that this is not an analogy that I myself am making (though I happily make use of it), but is one that is in wide circulation among the geeks I study. To the historian or religious critic, it may seem incomplete, or absurd, or bizarre, but it still serves a specific function, and this is why I highlight it as one component of the practical and technical ideas of order that geeks share.
={ Intellectual property ;
Luther, Martin +15 ;
reformation vs. revolution ;